SLIM BOOT KNIFE

$9.91
Available on backorder
  • Description

    •6.5″ OVERALL Length
    •Colorwooden Handle
    •with Sheath

    You never know when you’re going to need a good knife, for cleaning a kill, cutting some rope to hang a tarp when camping, or defending yourself against a violent attacker. Having the best boot knife on you at all times can keep you out of trouble, in any situation.

    With so many different sizes and types of knives to choose from, it may be hard to know which boot knife is the right one for you. But this can be an easy choice, if you keep in mind that the main purpose of a boot knife is for emergency defensive situations.

    You don’t want to have to try to pull a twelve inch blade out of your boot when threatened. First of all, it probably wouldn’t fit very well, and second, you would most likely slice yourself doing so in a rush. That’s why you should choose a smaller knife, with a blade of about 3 to 5 inches.

    Having a double edged blade is the most useful, so you don’t always have to be turning your knife to use it effectively. A sharp tip for smooth and easy piercing is also a must.

    There are a few different types of steel to choose from, and the stronger it is, the longer your knife will last. But better metal is also more costly, so if you’re on a budget, buy what you can afford.

    The Benefits of a Boot Knife

    Because of their versatility, a good boot knife can be used in many situations, by anyone from a novice to a professional. Some of the benefits of a boot knife are:

    • They can be used by military or law enforcement during emergency situations, or when stealth is necessary.
    • They are short and slim, making it easy to tuck it into your boot, attach it to a belt, or even place in a bag or purse if necessary
    • When camping, you can use your knife to cut veggies, fruit, meat, or even rope to hang a tarp. Stronger knives can even be used to cut some kindling for a fire.
    • Hunters and fishermen can use their boot knife for cleaning their meat or fish.
    • A boot knife can be easily concealed when you’re in areas where the sight of a knife could cause panic
    • You can use a boot knife to defend yourself in any type of threatening situation.

    If you already own a pair of boots that you love and are just looking for a way to hide your new boot knife in them, there is a very easy way to do this. All you need is your knife, its sheath, your boots, and a good piece of string or shoelace.

    First, put on the boots. Then take your sheathed knife and slide it into your boot. Make sure you put it on the proper side, which means if you are right handed, put the knife against the outside ankle of your right foot. The sheath should be high enough that you can pull the knife out safely, without cutting your leg.

    Take your string, find the middle of it, and then place that part over the sheath. Wrap the string around your leg and sheath about three times, to make sure it will stay where you placed it. Then tie it off, tie up your boot, and you’re ready to go.

    You can also tie your boot knife into the laces of your boots or shoes, as is demonstrated by this knife enthusiast.

    Tips for Using a Boot Knife

    When you decide to start carrying a boot knife, there are a few things to remember, to keep you safe and out of jail.

    • Make sure you have a good sheath, so the knife doesn’t slice through it. This will prevent injuries when you’re walking with it or pulling it out of your boot.
    • Don’t ever try to use your knife if you are off-balance. You could injure yourself if you fall, so keep the sheath on until you are stable on your feet.
    • Always check with your local law-enforcement before purchasing a knife. Certain types of knives are illegal in some areas, because of their length or the dual sided blade. There may also be laws about carrying a concealed weapon that you may not be aware of, so it is better to learn the laws early, to keep from unintentionally breaking them.
  • Specifications
    Weight
    4 oz
  • Accessories